Reviews

August 17th, 2010

five_starsReviewed by: Larry McGurn

Following a pattern just as strict—and just a fruitful in that strictness—as the sonnets that open each chapter, Bridge of Dreams covers a wide range of emotional, geographic and chronological territory. It traces the early and mid-life history of Jack, the ever-observant narrator, as his life is impacted by the powerful women who enter it. These women include the beautiful actress, Betty, who as a student of Jack’s, first begins to understand and exercise the power of her sexuality; Laura, the plain spoken and plain thinking companion who herself ends up in the entertainment industry; Christine, the young woman we watch grow from infancy to adulthood; and finally, the intriguing Countess, whose life story is an open doorway onto the Japanese culture and literary tradition. Read more…

five_starsReviewed by: Eleanor Bell

Robert Lawson’s metaphoric “bridge” spans a variety of spaces: in time, in geography, and in emotional and intellectual growth. The characters’ dreams progress from an early, vague incoherence to a later maturity forged by disappointments and victories that define ultimate acceptance. In other words, the characters grow up, largely because they rise above the conflicts—internal and external—that at times disrupt their lives. Read more…

five_starsReviewed by: David Tangeman

Here in Robert Lawson’s Bridge of Dreams, a sort of prairie Hamlet exists, haunted not by his father’s ghost, but by his murdered wife. Like Shakespeare, the author uses sonnet and theater. (Each chapter, in fact, opens with a sonnet.) Like Hamlet, the central character of Jack in this novel is drawn to theatricality. Jack begins the novel teaching drama in a Midwestern university, but soon finds himself swirled into plots conjured by the talented women who populate this novel. Read more…

five_starsReviewed by: Karen Sells Brown

Robert N. Lawson has carefully constructed a novel in which the form is as essential as that of the finely crafted sonnets with which he introduces each chapter. The story is framed by a meeting at an idyllic cabin in California. Jack, a playwright, is the analytical observer and also one of the central characters whose lives cross and re-cross in liaisons of passion and power. Read more…

five_starsReviewed by: Barbara Lerma

Robert Lawson’s Bridge of Dreams is the avid reader’s ideal book. This volume weaves great literature throughout the text, from classical Greece, through the medieval world and to contemporary works. It can be read as a modern, coming-of-age tale of 1950s college graduates finding their place in the world through drama or other intrigues. On this level, it is a page-turner with plenty of mystery. But much more provocative for serious readers will be the innovations of this text, which are the suggested readings or film screenings that precede each chapter. Read more…

five_starsReviewed by: Carol Yoho

Robert N. Lawson has the heart and soul of an educator. Chapter-end assignments give The Bridge Of Dreams readers an enriched experience and provide the blueprint to a solid literary education in the process.

five_stars Reviewed by: Barbara Brady

Not only will true scholars of great literature be delighted with The Bridge of Dreams, by Robert N. Lawson, but anyone who enjoys a good tale will be pulled into a saga filled with romance, drama, adventure, and mystery.  Each chapter, carefully fashioned into exactly 20 pages, is a story in itself.  A sonnet at the beginning of each chapter gives a hint of the story to follow.  Read more…

five_stars Reviewed by: Esther Luttrell

Bridge of Dreams is more than a book, and much more than a mere story filled with complex characters. It’s a work of literature, the kind not seen since Ayn Rand, Milton, Isben and Steinbeck.The writer refuses to simply entertain you. He intends for his readers to learn as they go, to experience what the characters experience, and reach some degree of enlightenment regarding the human condition, before the last page has been turned. Brava, Robert Lawson. What an undertaking.

five_stars Reviewed By: David Tallman

The first class I took in college was Introduction to Literature, taught by Dr Robert N. Lawson, and it remains my idea of what a college course should be.Read more…

five_starsReviewed By: Roy Lacousiere

This is an unusual novel by a de jure if not de facto retired English professor. Read more…


five_starsReviewed By: Evie Greene

Thank you so much for the interesting program about your book, The Bridge of Dreams. Read more…